Research shaping
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Specialist clinics
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The Perron Institute’s specialist clinics not only provide diagnosis, management and treatment for patients with complex neurological and neuromuscular diseases but they are involved in clinical research and clinical trials.

Clinical Trials

Clinical trials at the Perron Institute that are both pharmaceutical sponsored and investigator driven provide an opportunity for participation by some of our clinic patients. The Perron Institute consultants participating in clinical research and trials include Professors William Carroll, Allan Kermode, Soumya Ghosh and Frank Mastaglia, and Doctors Jason Burton and Merrilee Needham.

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Inclusion Body Myositis (IBM) trial

Dr Merrilee Needham is the Principal Investigator for the WA site within this phase 2B/3 international clinical trial. The trial is about testing a potential new treatment hope for sufferers of sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) for whom there are currently no approved treatments or cures.

Australia has the second largest number of trial participants (after the US) with trials being run in Melbourne, Sydney and Perth. the Perron Institute managed to randomise fourteen patients into this study which is the third highest worldwide for an individual centre.

The study has now entered the Extension phase with current trial participants awaiting the outcome of the interim analysis from the Core study. The results should be available in the latter part of 2016 with the decision on dosage to be decided at this time. The 10 patients who completed the Core study at the Perron Institute are eligible for ongoing treatment with study drug.

Innate Immunotherapeutics MS trial

In August 2014 the Perron Institute received approval to commence patient recruitment for Innate Immunotherapeutics’ Phase 2B trial of MIS416 in patients with Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS).

Led by Dr Jason Burton and C/Professor Allan Kermode, the Perron Institute was selected by Innate as the study’s lead site due to its strong focus on investigating the causes and improving the therapy and management of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. The institute has a strong focus on providing the best clinical management for multiple sclerosis available.

The Perron Institute recruited 13 patients into the study.

Innate Immunotherapeutics media release Phase 2B trial of MIS416

Channel 7 Perth – New hope for SPMS 30.08.14

Safety and Efficacy Study of MIS416 to Treat Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

This Phase IIB, randomised, double-blind trial will investigate the safety and efficacy of MIS416 in up to 90 participants across multiple sites in Australia. 60 patients will receive MIS416 and 30 will receive a placebo. MIS416 will be administered by once weekly intravenous infusions for 12 months.

The primary goal of the trial is to determine the efficacy and safety of MIS416 compared to patients treated with the placebo. Other objectives of the study are to determine the effect of MIS416 on disease activity and neurodegeneration by assessing changes in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), changes in Quality of Life and also assess the effects of MIS416 on the immune system.

MS balance trial

Recruiting for MS balance trial

The Centre for Restorative Neurology at the Perron Institute is currently recruiting for a clinical trial to improve walking and balance in patients with Relapsing Remitting and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis by combining balance training and non-invasive brain stimulation.

Centre for Restorative Neurology

Clinical trial in the use of newer modalities of treatment in the rehabilitation of MS patients.

Enhancing balance and gait in patients with Multiple Sclerosis – combined use of balance training with non-invasive brain stimulation.

This is a collaborative project between the Centre for Restorative Neurology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Multiple Sclerosis WA, and is supported by MS Research Australia.

This study aims to evaluate whether brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation – tDCS) added to a structured balance treatment program improves gait and balance, translating to increased mobility and independence in patients with MS.

We are looking to recruit people who are able to walk independently and have mild to moderate balance impairment. This intervention will be in addition to their regular outpatient therapy program prescribed by their physicians. All patients will participate in 2 weekly sessions of structured balance therapy for 6 weeks (12 sessions, each about 2 hours). Half of the group will receive the brain stimulation and half will receive the sham stimulation. To date there have been no adverse effects associated with tDCS.

Principal Investigator: Clinical Professor Soumya Ghosh, Director, Centre for Restorative Neurology

Co-investigators: Gary Thickbroom, Alec Ring, Michelle Byrnes, Ian Cooper, Jennifer Eisenhauer, David Hathorn, Emily Brough, Frank Mastaglia, Sue Walters, William Carroll, Allan Kermode and Jason Burton.

Should you have questions about the study please contact:

Prof. Soumya Ghosh / Sue Walters
at the Perron Institute clinic, phone (08) 6457 0200.

Centre for Restorative Neurology, the Perron Institute, QEII Medical Centre, 4th Floor, A Block Floor, Nedlands, WA 6009.

Phone: (08) 6457 0200 and Fax: (08) 6457 0281.

Stroke robotics trial

Recruiting for Stroke robotics trial

The Perron Institute’s Centre for Restorative Neurology is currently recruiting first ever ischemic stroke patients to enhancing recovery of function after stroke with a combined use of physical training (robot-assisted arm therapy) and non-invasive brain stimulation.

Centre for Restorative Neurology

Clinical trial in the use of newer modalities of treatment in the rehabilitation of stroke victims.

Enhancing recovery of function after stroke – combined use of physical training (robot-assisted arm therapy) with non-invasive brain stimulation.

This is a collaborative project between the Centre for Restorative Neurology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Royal Perth Rehabilitation Hospital (Shenton Park), Fremantle Hospital, and is supported by the Neurotrauma Research Program.

This study aims to evaluate whether brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation – tDCS) added to a computer controlled exercise (robot-guided arm therapy) will provide added benefit in recovery of the upper limb following stroke.

We are looking to recruit people who have had a first ever ischemic stroke causing arm weakness. This intervention will be in addition to their regular outpatient therapy program prescribed by their rehabilitation physicians.

This study will recruit patients within the first 6-9 months following stroke, when they are discharged from inpatient care. All patients will participate in 2-3 weekly sessions of robotic arm therapy for 6-9 weeks (18 sessions, each about 2 hours). Half of the group will receive the brain stimulation and half will receive the sham stimulation. To date there have been no adverse effects associated with either robotic arm therapy or tDCS.

Principal Investigator: Clinical Professor Soumya Ghosh, Director, Centre for Restorative Neurology.

Co-investigators: Prof. Gary Thickbroom, Dave Hathorn, Emily Brough, Susan Walters, Jennifer Eisenhauer, Assoc. Prof. Ian Cooper, Prof. Frank Mastaglia, Dr. Michelle Byrnes, Prof. Graeme Hankey, Prof. David Blacker, Dr. Tony Alvaro, Dr. Andrew Kelly, Dr. Lay Kun Kho, Prof. Dylan Edwards.

Should you have questions about the study please contact:

Prof. Soumya Ghosh/ Susan Walters

at the Perron Institute clinic, phone (08) 6457 0200.

Centre for Restorative Neurology, the Perron Institute, QEII Medical Centre, 4th Floor, A Block Floor, Nedlands, WA 6009.

Phone: (08) 6457 0200 and Fax: (08) 6457 0281.