21 January 2021

Exciting WA technology good news for dental patients

An innovative dental bone and tissue regenerating product developed in Western Australia has received marketing approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration.

The technology is the brainchild of Professor Minghao Zheng, Professor of Orthopaedic Research at The University of Western Australia and head of Brain and Bone Axis Research at the Perron Institute.

To be marketed under the brand name Striate+, the product will be available soon in the U.S. for use in dental procedures such as bone defect repair and building soft issue volume around dental implants.

The collagen bio scaffold has been commercialised by Orthocell – a Perth-based regenerative medical company developing products to facilitate tissue repair and healing in various dental, nerve and orthopaedic reconstructive applications.

Professor Zheng’s Striate+ breakthrough began with the development of a bio scaffold to repair damaged tendons. The journey led on to exploring the potential for repairing nerves and then to speeding up the healing process and achieving better outcomes in dealing with dental problems.

“It has taken a lot of time and money and I can’t thank Orthocell enough for supporting my research, providing my many students with translational research projects, and of course undertaking the clinical trials that have resulted in the Food and Drug Administration approval,” he said.

Steve Arnott, Perron Institute Chief Executive Officer said the recent announcement of FDA approval for this exciting new technology was wonderful news for all concerned and for Western Australian medical research.

“Translating innovative thinking to commercial outcomes for the benefit of the community is at the forefront of the Perron Institute’s charter. The journey is rigorous and lengthy and FDA approval is a great milestone for any technology.

“We are very proud to have Professor Zheng and his team as part of the Perron Institute.”

innovative dental bone and tissue regenerating product

Photo credit: The University of Western Australia.